Gurubashi War

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Gurubashi War
Gurubashi War
Location: Stormwind, Elwynn Forest, Westfall
Outcome: Stormwindian victory
Belligerents
Commanders and leaders
Strength
Casualties and losses
  • Moderate
  • Very heavy

The Gurubashi War[2] was a major conflict fought between the Kingdom of Stormwind, and the Gurubashi Trolls of Stranglethorn Vale. The war would ultimately cause the death of King Barathen Wrynn and the ascension of King Llane Wrynn as King of Stormwind.

History

Prelude

Years after the Gnoll Wars, Stormwind's farmers and settlers would increasingly push southward claiming territory close to the jungles of Stranglethorn Vale, home of the Gurubashi Tribe. Skirmishes would erupt between the Gurubashi and Stormwind forces but the elderly Barathen would refuse to order an invasion into Stranglethorn and was focused on fighting a defensive war, much to the outrage of his son Prince Llane. While King Barathen's strategy against the Gurubashi was effective it would be unable to stop every attack, one which saw slow, barbaric, and gruesome deaths delivered to the villagers of three towns in Westfall. This would ultimately prove to be final straw of Prince Llane, Anduin Lothar and Medivh, who in defiance of his father's continued de-escalation, journeyed south to bring war to the Gurubashi. Though initially shielded by Medivh's magic the three friends would end up in the fight for their lives when they battled Jok'non, a Gurubashi Warlord empowered by Hakkar the Soulflayer. Ultimately the three friends would be prove victorious and return to Stormwind, shaken by Medivh's powers.

Gurubashi Vengeance

While none of the Gurubashi who witnessed Jok'non's death survived, it took very to the imagination for the trolls to see who was responsible. Rallying under Jok'non's son, Zan'non, the Gurubashi launched an invasion intent on destroying Stormwind. In the face of the troll onslaught Barathen recalled all his forces to the stronghold's gate, believing that the survival of Stormwind would depend on one colossal battle. As the death toll mounted on both sides Barathen mounted a desperate counterattack against the Gurubashi. Though almost succeeding in claiming Zan'non's head, Barathen would die on the field of battle. Llane, driven by guilt, would plead with Medivh to unleash his power on the Gurubashi as he done against Jok'non. Though frightened of his power Medivh would accept Llane's request and destroy the Gurubashi forces (Zan'non included), an act that would ultimately avenge Barathen.[3]

Aftermath

With the defeat of the Gurubashi trolls (only a handful would survive Medivh's power), the citizens of Stormwind mourned their dead and celebrated it's heroes. Medivh would be seen as the realm's greatest defenders, Llane welcomed as Stormwind's new King, and Lothar would see only approval upon being raised as one of the military's top commanders. The secret mission under taken by Llane and his friends would never be known to the public and all three would see the war as consequence for their rash actions. Additionally Medivh would come to see that he did not have the will or mental fortitude to control his Guardian birthright and thus journeyed to Karazhan in order learn from his mother on how to control his powers.[4]

The Gurubashi War would later be used by Sargeras (who was residing within Medivh) to deceive the guardian into believing Azeroth had moved away from the purpose and unity present in the War of the Ancients and had descended into pretty squabbling and bickering.[5] An action that ultimately lead to Medivh to consulting with Gul'dan and bringing the Horde into Azeroth.

Notes and trivia

  • The Gurubashi war seems to be inspired by the graphic novel Bonds of Brotherhood set in the film universe. It is not exactly identical, however. In said comic the Gurubashi used the power of fel, not Hakkar, and Medivh likewise used fel instead of arcane to stop them.
  • The Clerics of Northshire were known to have healed some jungle trolls during the war.[1]

References