Druz

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HordeDruz
Image of Druz
Gender Male
Race Goblin
Affiliation(s) Bilgewater Cartel
Occupation Chief enforcer to Trade Prince Gallywix
Location Pandaria (last known)
Status Alive
Companion(s) Jastor Gallywix
Booknovel.png
This article contains lore taken from Warcraft novels, novellas, or short stories.
Mr. Gallywix," Druz corrected. "Or Trade Prince Gallywix. Never just Gallywix. And maybe you don't know him like I do.
— Druz

Druz is the chief enforcer of Trade Prince Jastor Gallywix.

History

A childhood friend of Jastor's, and son of a cement mixer, the two began working together during Gallywix's rise to power in Kezan. He fought in at least one of the Trade Wars.[1]

The Blank Scroll

Druz came to Pandaria with his boss after the mists had parted. They harbored their uberzeppelin off the northern coast of the continent in order to inspire the plundersquads sent to pillage and loot. One night, a squad led by Ziya accidentally exposed a lorevault, a vault for the Lorewalkers to store and hide dangerous pandaren artifacts.

Seeing the distress call from the squad, Druz personally landed on the shore, but Lorewalker Shuchun refused to let him and Ziya enter the vault. She told them of the dangers of the vault yet it fell on deaf ears. Shuchun had no choice but to lead both Druz and Ziya into the vault, as she knew the two goblins would otherwise be lost to the defense mechanism. In doing so, she hoped to convince them that the dangerous artifacts stored within were put there for a reason. As they faced various challenges based on pandaren legends, Druz and Ziya argued over the purpose of the war against the Alliance, the true nature of Trade Prince Gallywix, and the danger of seeking simple answers to complex problems, eventually realizing that their arguments were actually creating the traps. The source of these creations turned out to be a dangerous pandaren artifact: the Blank Scroll.

Druz and Ziya attempted to claim the scroll. Realizing that her warnings were going unheeded, Lorewalker Shuchun activated the scroll, and showed the goblins a vision of a terrible future. In the vision, the Bilgewater Cartel goblins were declared traitors to the Horde for hiding a powerful weapon from Warchief Garrosh Hellscream. The Exodar, Teldrassil and Stormwind were destroyed by the orcs, and Azeroth itself was devastated by the Burning Legion and horrors from the sea.

Stunned by what they had seen, Druz and Ziya decided to leave the Blank Scroll in Lorewalker Shuchun's hands. Druz gave Ziya some paid time off to escort Lorewalker Shuchun "where she needs to go". Ziya found she was grateful for some respite from the war she had fought for years.[2]

Before the Storm

Following the end of the Argus Campaign, Druz accompanied Jastor to Tanaris to meet Grizzek Fizzwrench.[3] Druz and the other bruisers remained with Grizzek to guard and supervise him. He later appeared when Sapphronetta Flivvers was delivered to the engineer by Kezzig Klackwhistle. Druz was ready to take care of her, if needed, but Grizzek sent him away instead.[4] Druz learned about the laboratory sabotage and escape attempt of Grizzek and Saffy and caught them, completely thwarting their plans. Grizzek tried to plead with Druz of their necessity, but the enforcer revealed they can make do with the inventors' confiscated research. Furthermore, the enforcer had his orders from Gallywix to eliminate them. Druz had the inventors bound and ordered Kezzig to place a bomb between them.[5]

Personality

While Gallywix was widely known for his unscrupulous and ruthless antics, little was ever said of Druz and his own talents, including his ability to make Jastor's enemies disappear. He is also known for his research; Druz always seems to know the names and weaknesses of everyone he meets.

Druz is highly loyal to Gallywix, and views the trade prince's antics as par for the course in goblin society. He dismisses Gallywix's crimes against his own people (including the enslavement of their cartel), implying the goblins were only sold because they were careless.

References